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History of Great Britain and Ireland Henry White

History of Great Britain and Ireland

Henry White

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230263779
Paperback
200 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1849 edition. Excerpt: ... with the three creedsMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1849 edition. Excerpt: ... with the three creeds as the sole standards of faith. Every parish priest was ordered to expound these to the people- and an English translation of the Bible was printed, one copy of which was to be kept in each parish church. Henry further insisted on the necessity of auricular confession, and denounced all doubts regarding the real presence in the eucharist as a damnable heresy. In the districts round London the religious innovations were received with little resistance, but in proportion to the distance from the capital the opposition to the changes became greater. In Lincolnshire the common people took up arms to the number of 20,000 men, forcing the gentry to become their leaders, and swear to their articles. The Duke of Suffolk was sent against them, but he found the insurrection so formidable, that he was glad to negotiate. Dissensions soon appeared among the insurgents, and they A.d.i retired to their houses after fifteen victims had been 1536./ yielded up to the royal vengeance. Another fierce rebellion broke out on the north of the Trent, which rapidly spread from Yorkshire into Durham, Northumberland, Westmoreland, and Lancashire. The rebels, under the command of a gentleman named Robert Aske, amounted to 40,000 men- and wherever they advanced the monks and nuns were restored to their houses, and the nobility and gentry compelled to join their ranks. Their principal complaints were against the Lutheran doctrines and heretical books, the kings assumption of ecclesiastical supremacy, the game laws, and the cruel statutes regarding treason. The Duke of Norfolk endeavoured to disperse the insurgents-by negotiation and by sowing dissensions among them. His army was too weak to hazard a battle- but the cold and stormy November...