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Compendium of Chemistry: Including General, Inorganic, and Organic Chemistry Carl Arnold

Compendium of Chemistry: Including General, Inorganic, and Organic Chemistry

Carl Arnold

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781330324172
Paperback
642 pages
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Excerpt from Compendium of Chemistry: Including General, Inorganic, and Organic ChemistryThe aim of the natural sciences is the investigation of the objects and processes of nature. They are divided into the special sciences, each of which isMoreExcerpt from Compendium of Chemistry: Including General, Inorganic, and Organic ChemistryThe aim of the natural sciences is the investigation of the objects and processes of nature. They are divided into the special sciences, each of which is devoted to a certain kingdom of nature or a portion thereof, and the general sciences, which are confined to no special kingdom of nature. The general sciences are divided into physics and chemistry.The earlier division of the natural sciences into descriptive (including natural history, botany, zoology, mineralogy, and astronomy) and exact (including natural philosophy, chemistry, physics, and biology) is no longer in accordance with the conditions, since chemistry, on the one hand, as it must also take into consideration the external characteristics of chemical substances, is at once a descriptive science, while, on the other hand, botany, etc., since they must investigate not only the external reality but also the chemical and physical changes transpiring within, are exact as well as descriptive sciences.Matter, material, or substance may be defined as anything which can be weighed without reference to its configuration.Body is the name given to anything having a definite form. For example, iron, glass, and marble are forms of matter, while a knife, a drinking-glass, and a marble statue are bodies.Chemistry is the science of matter, its properties and its changes- its foundation is the law of the conservation of matter (p. 10), which states that no loss of matter can take place in any chemical change. All phenomena which accompany an alteration of matter belong to the domain of chemistry.For example, sulphur and iron mixed together give an apparently homogeneous, gray powder, in which, however, the separate particles of iron and sulphur can be detected with the aid of a microscope and can be separated from each other by a magnet.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.