Home » Late Iron Age Scotland: Gododdin, Saint Ninian, Kingdom of Strathclyde, Scotia, y Gododdin, Hen Ogledd, Manaw Gododdin, Aeron by Books LLC
Late Iron Age Scotland: Gododdin, Saint Ninian, Kingdom of Strathclyde, Scotia, y Gododdin, Hen Ogledd, Manaw Gododdin, Aeron Books LLC

Late Iron Age Scotland: Gododdin, Saint Ninian, Kingdom of Strathclyde, Scotia, y Gododdin, Hen Ogledd, Manaw Gododdin, Aeron

Books LLC

Published August 17th 2011
ISBN : 9781157176855
Paperback
26 pages
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 25. Chapters: Gododdin, Saint Ninian, Kingdom of Strathclyde, Scotia, Y Gododdin, Hen Ogledd, Manaw Gododdin,MorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 25. Chapters: Gododdin, Saint Ninian, Kingdom of Strathclyde, Scotia, Y Gododdin, Hen Ogledd, Manaw Gododdin, Aeron, Bridei I of the Picts, M el Ruba, Senchus fer n-Alban, Curet n, Nechtan Morbet, Drest VI of the Picts, Kingarth, Trumwine of Abercorn, Galam Cennalath, Gartnait IV of the Picts, Gartnait III of the Picts, Talorc III of the Picts, Bridei II of the Picts, Pictish Chronicle, Calchfynydd, James E. Fraser, Kingdom of Cait, Cailtram, Drest IV of the Picts, Gartnait I of the Picts, Galan Erilich, Talorc II of the Picts, Drest III of the Picts, Drest Gurthinmoch, Drest V of the Picts. Excerpt: Y Gododdin (pronounced ) is a medieval Welsh poem consisting of a series of elegies to the men of the Britonnic kingdom of Gododdin and its allies who, according to the conventional interpretation, died fighting the Angles of Deira and Bernicia at a place named Catraeth. It is traditionally ascribed to the bard Aneirin, and survives only in one manuscript, known as the Book of Aneirin. There is general agreement among scholars that the battle commemorated would have happened around the year 600, but there is debate about the date of the poetry. Some scholars consider that the original, oral version was composed in the Hen Ogledd - the Brythonic-speaking parts of northern Britain - soon after the battle. In this case the original language of the poem would have been that spoken in the region at the time, known as Cumbric- this would make it the oldest surviving poem from what is now Scotland. Others, however, believe that it originated in Wales in the 9th or the 10th century. If it is 9th-century, it would be one of the earliest poems written in a form of Welsh. The Gododdin, known in Roman times as the Votadini, held territories in what is now southeast Scotland and Northumberland, part of the Hen Ogledd (Old North). The poem tells h...